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Marine pest found in the harbour
19 Jun 2015
The marine pest Mediterranean fanworm has been found in Gisborne harbour by divers inspecting the training wall. Only one fanworm was found last week and it may be possible to eradicate it. “We’re currently working through what options are available with the Ministry of Primary Industries as Council doesn’t have underwater capability,” says shared services science manager Lois Easton. “Department of Conservation has previously assisted Council with marine pest incursions, and we will ask Eastland Port whether they can also assist us.” Fanworm is considered an unwanted pest found mainly in ports or estuaries in 1m – 30m deep water. “It can have significant environmental impacts as well as extensively fouling boats and marine structures,” says Ms Easton. The fanworm has become established in Lyttelton Port, the wider Waitemata Harbour in Auckland and in Whangarei Harbour. The worm can be transported on dirty boat hulls, inside sea chests and emergency fire intakes. Boat operators are reminded to keep hulls clean, ensure the antifouling paint is in good condition and to always check their hulls and equipment such as buoys, boat trailers and fishing gear to prevent transferring the pest between locations. Read more >>
Annual phone survey has begun
18 Jun 2015
You may get a phone call this month asking you to take part in our annual resident satisfaction survey. Read more >>
Oneora's finishing touches with local support
8 Jun 2015
350 plants have been planted and 15,000 screws have been installed, all by volunteer labour as construction of the 1km long Oneroa cycle and walkway nears completion. On Saturday 6 June, Aborcare and Rotary Club of Gisborne West donated their time and effort to setting out and planting 350 natives around the 2 bbq areas along the walkway. “This has been a real community driven project,” says project manager Kylie Cranston, “we’re very lucky to have support from groups such as Rotary and our contractors.” Members of the Certified Builders Association provided volunteer labour to install some of the 3,800 decking boards over the past 3 weeks. “It was an awesome effort from a number of local building firms including Character Building and Roofing Ltd, Steve Candy Building, Brendan Fry Builder, JB Puddick Ltd, Steve Crail Builder, Fogarty Construction, Digby Toothill Builders and Shayne Tuapawa.” The boardwalk will be finished next week with the dune planting commencing next week also. Another separate donation from the Rotary Club of Gisborne will also see 4 new bench seats installed at the Beacon Street car park. “We're grateful to both Rotary clubs for their immense support,” says Ms Cranston. “The works at Grey Street will be the final piece to the puzzle with construction of 2 rain gardens, concrete paths and a lookout platform with steps down to the beach.” Toihoukura students have carved some seats which will be installed at Grey Street and Roberts Road along with picnic tables, showers, drinking fountains and bike racks all using recycled timber. All the furniture has been custom designed so it will be unique to Gisborne. Construction is expected to be completed in July. For more information about the project[/oneroa-beachfront-cycle-and-walkway/] Read more >>
Grants open for erosion control
3 Jun 2015
Gisborne district landowners have the opportunity to apply for funding from the Erosion Control Funding Programme (ECFP) administered by the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) with the next funding round now open until 30 June 2015. Read more >>
Concern over log debris
3 Jun 2015
Wood debris has been deposited on the beach at the mouth of the Maraetaha River and on the banks of the river and its tributaries after an intense rainfall in the Wharerata’s over the weekend. Council is very disappointed that this extent of forestry debris is again fouling beaches and water ways. “The rain event was severe with reports of 105 mm over 24 hours and over 60 mm at the seaward end of the catchment,” says shared services science manager Lois Easton. “We met with landowners and interested people prior to a site inspection at the forest. We found that slip erosion has occurred in places with recently established trees. “Woody material and sediment have migrated into watercourses and downstream. Council have held numerous meetings over the past few years with landowner representatives and the forestry sector in an effort to introduce and maintain practises that avoid this downstream event. “The debris is mixed in size and can’t be attributed to any one particular source. We would prosecute if it was appropriate.” There are no signs of land collapse or erosion as a result of roading or extraction activities. Council and the forest industry maintain an environmental group who meet on a regular basis and are identifying ways of dealing with woody debris in the long term. “Short term effects are more difficult to deal with,” says Ms Easton. A meeting will be held with the affected local community, council staff and forestry representatives in the next six weeks to look at the findings from the inspection on Tuesday and discuss solutions. A report will be presented to the Future Tairawhiti meeting on 16 July on options to reduce the amount of slash entering waterways. Read more >>

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