Web Banner Tairawhiti

News

Show Sidebar

News

Council media releases

<< Prev | 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 | Next >>

Minister visits Te Arai fresh water project
2 Sep 2015
The Minister for the Environment (MfE), Hon Dr Nick Smith was given an update on a project to identify and restore spawning habitats in the Te Arai River, when he visited the Gisborne region yesterday. Last year Council received funding from the Ministry to undertake a community-based pilot project within the Lower Waipaoa and Te Arai catchment areas to identify, protect and enhance inanga (whitebait) spawning sites. The minister visited the river at a Waingake Road property to meet with representatives of the project from Gisborne District Council, the Tairawhiti Environment Centre and Rongowhakaata. The project has been underway since December 2014. “It aims to develop the capacity within local community and iwi groups to identify potential fish spawning areas and to undertake restoration of these areas,” says environmental and regulatory services group manager Kevin Strongman. “Inanga are an important customary and recreational food source for people. “They’re also an important food source for other species, identifying and enhancing their habitat could result in positive cultural, social and ecological outcomes for the area. “The pilot will help us develop a programme for the rest of our region.” Earlier this year scientific advisor and native fishery expert, Hans Rook gave a public talk on restoring habitats for native fish and how this could be achieved in Tairāwhiti. Rook has been working with the project team to map spawning sites in the catchment, including the Te Arai and Maraetaha Rivers. “We’ve learned inanga lay their eggs at a fairly high tide in grassy areas around where the salt water meets the freshwater,” says Mr Strongman. “A spawning site may look like milk has been dropped along the grasses.” Preferred grasses are known to be tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) and creeping bent (Agrostis stolonifera). Protecting these sites through fencing, vegetation management and excluding stock can contribute to an improved fishery. “Council can help to regulate activities around spawning sites like those proposed in the regional Freshwater Plan that will come into effect in October.” More work with Rongowhakaata, Ngai Tamanuhiri and the landowners will happen over the next few months with the final report to MfE due in December. Read more >>
Training wall walkway ruled out - stories still told
1 Sep 2015
Work carried out to investigate structural requirements for the river training wall has turned up some disappointment for the Tairāwhiti Navigations project. “Underwater investigations on the training wall has confirmed it could not support a walkway in its current state,” says chief executive Judy Campbell. A walkway along the training wall from Lone Star to the slipway was a highlight feature of the Navigations project within the inner harbour precinct. Diving teams have been surveying the training wall since June, to assist Council in planning the construction costs. “The engineer’s report identified load bearing issues in some areas of the wall. The cost to repair it up to the required standard exceeds the current project budget,” says Ms Campbell. “It’s disappointing but it means we can put more energy into the other infrastructure in the inner harbour, slipway, bridges, and the story-telling elements.” “We first need to ensure this is how Council wants us to proceed before going back to Eastland Community Trust to get permission to vary the funding contract.” ECT awarded $5m grant funding in 2014 for the development of the river training wall walkway. The project plans to enhance local landmarks with upgraded infrastructure and design features, and create a heritage experience trail. “The stories of our founding navigators like Kiwa, Paoa and Cook are unique to our district. These stories are the main attraction of the sites within this part of the project.” Research is underway, working with tangata whenua and historical data to gather the stories that could be told about early Māori and European navigators. “We’re exploring ways we can present these stories not just through art, but technology installations and online resources.” The construction elements are still being scoped for a clip-on walkway for the railway bridge and a footbridge over the Turanganui River connecting the slipway to the Waikanae Beach front. “There will still be access to the slipway via a new Turanganui Bridge and it will still be just as impressive in design as what we had envisaged for the training wall.” An inner harbour upgrade is also part of Navigations with the first stakeholder meeting held last week to get feedback on design requirements for upgrading the street scape, parking and amenities. Auckland urban design company LandLab will lead this design process. The project encompasses the restoration of Titirangi, Kaiti Hill, as an important part of the heritage trail. Pathways and storytelling will be created to connect with the inner harbour. “We will look at options for improving visibility and connectivity to the Cook Landing site, which is also a nationally significant monument.” The infrastructure, stories and interpretations in the inner harbour and Titirangi are the first stage of the project which is intended to extend to other historically important sites in Tairāwhiti. Read more >>
Unanimous for Joint Management Agreement
28 Aug 2015
A unanimous decision by Gisborne District Council yesterday will see the development Joint Management Agreement (JMA) formed with Te Runanganui o Ngati Porou for the Waiapu Catchment. “A JMA is a logical progression of the existing Waiapu Accord and the Waiapu Kōkā Hūhua joint collaborative project to address erosion in the catchment,” says Mayor Meng Foon. “Heading into development of a Waiapu catchment plan and notification of the proposed freshwater plan for the region in October, “Council recognises the fundamental role Ngati Porou have as kaitiaki, as a source of knowledge, and acknowledges their interests in the future management of the awa. “In establishing a JMA, we will be the first in New Zealand to jointly share the functions, powers and duties under the Resource Management Act.” Council has been exploring options for co-management and co-governance of Waiapu with the runanga since January. A JMA would enable the runanganui and Council to join staff resources for research and development of a catchment plan for the Waiapu River and its tributaries, as well as joint decision-making on how water is used within the catchment. Catchment plans contain water quality and quantity objectives, limits and targets for individual waterways and wetlands. “From here, staff will draft the agreement with Ngati Porou representatives and attend a meeting with landowners to make sure they’re comfortable.” A paper will be submitted to Future Tairāwhiti on 24 September for discussion before heading to the October 8 full meeting of Council to be adoption. The proposed Freshwater Plan for the Gisborne Region is also due to be approved for public notification at the October 8 meeting. Read more >>
Mapping crops for freshwater
27 Aug 2015
Out on the hunt out ‘in the field’ this week, the Council environmental services team has been busy searching for crops grown for animal feed in the winter. Read more >>
Whatatutu water supply granted
20 Aug 2015
A $386,000 subsidy for upgrading the Whatatutu community to a treated water supply was awarded to Gisborne District Council last week. “We’re very pleased that our application was successful and we can make clean safe drinking water available to the Whatatutu community,” says water utilities manager Neville West. “The current supply doesn’t meet New Zealand Drinking Water Standards,” “There are high levels of sediment from the bore, which the process equipment cannot treat adequately.” The upgrade will allow all households to connect up to a 100% treated water supply and more water would be available. “Without MoH funding an upgrade costing $500,000 may have fallen to the ratepayer, or without it, if the existing system stopped working residents would become fully reliant on rainwater supply and delivered tankers to top up.” Council submitted an application for 85% of funding to the Ministry earlier this year in February. “This has taken considerable effort to get across the line,” says Mr West. An original application prepared by OPUS in 2014 was declined. As part of the funding requirements residents and owners in Whatatutu needed to agree if it went ahead all houses would eventually need to progress onto the new system. “We met with people in Whatatutu to talk about the options. Everyone who responded with feedback agreed that the upgrade would be best for their health and well-being.” The funding contract will be finalised with the Ministry of Health in the next month and then a tender put out for the design and construction. “We expect the supply to be in and running by June next year.” Mayor Meng Foon, says the Whatatutu community will see a marked improvement on water quality, consistent supply and improved general health in this community. Read more >>

<< Prev | 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 | Next >>

Last updated: